Hello, welcome to my corner of the internet! My name is Holly, and I'm a 18-year-old girl who lives in the USA. This is most definitely a multi-fandom blog, and it may have spoilers and NSFW content.

Also, feel free to feed the fish! If you want a fish-y theme, follow the directions at http://freetexthost.com/iw6jfmz1fd .

 

How to talk to your daughter about her body, step one: don’t talk to your daughter about her body, except to teach her how it works.

Don’t say anything if she’s lost weight. Don’t say anything if she’s gained weight.

If you think your daughter’s body looks amazing, don’t say that. Here are some things you can say instead:

“You look so healthy!” is a great one.

Or how about, “you’re looking so strong.”

“I can see how happy you are – you’re glowing.”

Better yet, compliment her on something that has nothing to do with her body.

Don’t comment on other women’s bodies either. Nope. Not a single comment, not a nice one or a mean one.

Teach her about kindness towards others, but also kindness towards yourself.

Don’t you dare talk about how much you hate your body in front of your daughter, or talk about your new diet. In fact, don’t go on a diet in front of your daughter. Buy healthy food. Cook healthy meals. But don’t say “I’m not eating carbs right now.” Your daughter should never think that carbs are evil, because shame over what you eat only leads to shame about yourself.

Encourage your daughter to run because it makes her feel less stressed. Encourage your daughter to climb mountains because there is nowhere better to explore your spirituality than the peak of the universe. Encourage your daughter to surf, or rock climb, or mountain bike because it scares her and that’s a good thing sometimes.

Help your daughter love soccer or rowing or hockey because sports make her a better leader and a more confident woman. Explain that no matter how old you get, you’ll never stop needing good teamwork. Never make her play a sport she isn’t absolutely in love with.

Prove to your daughter that women don’t need men to move their furniture.

Teach your daughter how to cook kale.

Teach your daughter how to bake chocolate cake made with six sticks of butter.

Pass on your own mom’s recipe for Christmas morning coffee cake. Pass on your love of being outside.

Maybe you and your daughter both have thick thighs or wide ribcages. It’s easy to hate these non-size zero body parts. Don’t. Tell your daughter that with her legs she can run a marathon if she wants to, and her ribcage is nothing but a carrying case for strong lungs. She can scream and she can sing and she can lift up the world, if she wants.

Remind your daughter that the best thing she can do with her body is to use it to mobilize her beautiful soul.

(via ittaco)

(Source: moxie-bird)

ayatokiwa:

our biology teacher brought a skeleton to class yesterday and now everyone’s treating it as if it’s a part if our class i’m going to

ayatokiwa:

our biology teacher brought a skeleton to class yesterday and now everyone’s treating it as if it’s a part if our class i’m going to

I promise to love you:

at 6am when you’re waking to go to work, to school, or whatever road life takes you on, and when you didn’t sleep well, your hair is a mess, and your eyes are sleepy.

at 8am when we say goodbye for the day and you’re rushing out the door with a cup of tea and your car keys in the other hand.

at 5pm when you’re exhausted from the day and people have worn you out and you feel like crying, and falling asleep and escaping from everything. I will kiss your forehead, and wrap myself in your arms.

at 10pm when you’re heading to bed, even though you won’t sleep for hours. Especially when we become a human knot wrapped up in sheets and kisses.

at 3am when loneliness and sadness do not destroy you, but consume you and when you weep without an explanation, I’ll kiss your lips softly and tell you you’re the absolute best and that things will be better soon

I will love you when you grow old, and I will love you after that. I will love you if I’m no longer here. I will love you, I will love you, and I will love you.

I Promise To Love You Forever (via chelseachiodos)

sometimes I just have to remember how beautiful this is.

(via allofthisfrustratesmebad)

(Source: -poetic)

arkilliandragon:

ecmajor:

architectureofdoom:

A climbing plant peels off a brick building, in an effect reminiscent of a snake shedding a layer of skin

holy shit, i have never seen this happen before. Whoah

I love that the bricks underneath were perfectly clean

arkilliandragon:

ecmajor:

architectureofdoom:

A climbing plant peels off a brick building, in an effect reminiscent of a snake shedding a layer of skin

holy shit, i have never seen this happen before. Whoah

I love that the bricks underneath were perfectly clean

(Source: malformalady)

Neil Patrick Harris and David Burtka reenact the spaghetti scene from Lady and the Tramp (x)

(Source: matchingvnecks)

spzeed:

satanswaitin6669:

yamiyuugis:

tedaltmans:

since i already reblogged a post about mel gonzales (pictured right), i didnt want to pass by mentioning scarlett lenh (pictured left), a trans girl who won homecoming queen at her high school in colorado
link to article

tpoc YES

Being trans doesn’t or at least shouldn’t entitle you to something, you can still be trans and a shitty person or an asshole. This isn’t equal treatment, this is special treatment and quite frankly I think it’s condescending. 

Transgender people are, surprise, people — and we are entitled to the same things that cisgender people are entitled to. We are entitled to feel normal, which includes the ability to run in a meaningless popularity contest such as being homecoming king, queen, or gender-neutral royalty. We are entitled to not suffer, as trans students have in the past during homecoming when schools have purposefully misgendered students by having trans boys be put under “queen” on the voting slip et cetera. We are entitled to the same treatment that cisgender individuals receive, with the only difference that we are thankful for it — which I hope we are not someday, and I hope we are not thankful for it because it has become commonplace and something to be taken for granted. But right now? It is not common place, and it is not condescending to celebrate that trans students were (for once) not raped in a bathroom or treated like complete shit today.
tl;dr: its messed up that you think that trans students not being treated like shit is somehow “special treatment”.

spzeed:

satanswaitin6669:

yamiyuugis:

tedaltmans:

since i already reblogged a post about mel gonzales (pictured right), i didnt want to pass by mentioning scarlett lenh (pictured left), a trans girl who won homecoming queen at her high school in colorado

link to article

tpoc YES

Being trans doesn’t or at least shouldn’t entitle you to something, you can still be trans and a shitty person or an asshole. This isn’t equal treatment, this is special treatment and quite frankly I think it’s condescending. 

Transgender people are, surprise, people — and we are entitled to the same things that cisgender people are entitled to. We are entitled to feel normal, which includes the ability to run in a meaningless popularity contest such as being homecoming king, queen, or gender-neutral royalty. We are entitled to not suffer, as trans students have in the past during homecoming when schools have purposefully misgendered students by having trans boys be put under “queen” on the voting slip et cetera. We are entitled to the same treatment that cisgender individuals receive, with the only difference that we are thankful for it — which I hope we are not someday, and I hope we are not thankful for it because it has become commonplace and something to be taken for granted. But right now? It is not common place, and it is not condescending to celebrate that trans students were (for once) not raped in a bathroom or treated like complete shit today.

tl;dr: its messed up that you think that trans students not being treated like shit is somehow “special treatment”.